Adult Mental Illness Rates by State

Just over 4 percent of Pennsylvania adults reported experiencing severe mental illness in the past year, while approximately 18 percent reported any mental illness during the same time period, according to the new brief from SAMHSA, State Estimates of Adult Mental Illness for the 2011 and 2012 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health. The report contains data from over 92,000 adults in the United States who participated in the National Survey of Drug Use and Health in 2011 and 2012.  The rate in Pennsylvania has increased only incrementally since the 2008 and 2009 report, when 3.5 percent of adults in Pennsylvania reported a severe mental illness in the past year, while 17.7  percent reported any mental illness.

In the 2011, 2012 report, West Virginia had the highest rate of severe mental illness (5.5 percent) reported among adults, as well as the highest rate of any mental illness among adults, 21.4 percent. There does not seem to be any regional correlation to rates of mental illness, as states with high and low rates of both severe mental illness and any mental illness are located in all regions of the country.  However, these data can assist in examining connections between mental health and other health issues at the state level, such as the link between mental illness and non-response to traditional anti-smoking interventions, hopefully leading to similar innovative approaches to public policy.

 

 

 

Report Citations:

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (February 28, 2014). The NSDUH Report: State Estimates of Adult Mental Illness from the 2011 and 2012 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health. Rockville, MD.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (October 6, 2011). The NSDUH Report: State Estimates of Adult Mental Illness. Rockville, MD.

Does Knowledge of Health Risks Reduce Teen Smoking?

Fewer adolescents are smoking cigarettes even though their attitudes about the risks associated with smoking have not decreased, according to a report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

The report, State Estimates of Adolescent Cigarette Use and Perceptions of Risk of Smoking: 2009 and 2010  describes the beneficial impact of smoking prevention and education programming on adolescent smoking rates, although the impact was not apparent in all states.

Ohio and West Virginia were among states with the highest rates of teenage smokers (11.2 and 11.9 percent respectively) though both saw their rates decrease significantly since 2002-03. In Pennsylvania, 10.3 percent of adolescents reported they had smoked in the past month according to the 2009-10 data, another significant decrease from 2002.  Overall, 44 states in the county experienced significant decreases in adolescent smoking during this decade.

Nationally, the adolescent rate of perceived health risk from smoking a pack of cigarettes daily increased from 63.7 percent in 2002-03 to 65.4 percent in 2009-2010. Only five states saw significant growth in the amount of teens who perceived a great risk from smoking cigarettes daily as well as a significant decline in their rate of smoking.

 

 

 

Citation: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Report: State Estimates of Adolescent Cigarette Use and Perceptions of Risk from Smoking: 2009 and 2010. Rockville, MD